POOR DEVILS OR GODS OF PAST ASTROLOGICAL AGES

The Mith of Transition from the Age of Taurus to the Age of Aries

The Mith of Achelous , the Bull God, symbol of the age of Taurus (4000 b.C. – 2000 b.C.) defeated by Hercules (the Sun) and the coming of Zeus Ammon, the Ram God (2000 b.C. – 0 C.E.).

The god of the river Achelous which was the greatest, and according to tradition, the most ancient among the rivers of Greece. He with 3000 brother-rivers is described as a son of Oceanus and Thetys (Hes. Theog. 340), or of Oceanus and Gaea, or lastly of Helios and Gaea. (Natal. Com. vii. 2.)

Achelous, the Bull God

Achelous, the Bull God

 

Rising of Sun at Vernal Equinox in Taurus Constellation (4000 b.C. – 2000 b.C.)

 

The origin of the river Achelous is thus described by Servius (ad Virg. Georg. i. 9; Aen. viii. 300): When Achelous on one occasion had lost his daughters, the Sirens, and in his grief invoked his mother Gaea, she received him to her bosom, and on the spot where she received him, she caused the river bearing his name to gush forth. Other accounts about the origin of the river and its name are given by Stephanus of Byzantium, Strabo (x. p. 450), and Plutarch. (De Flum. 22.) Achelous the god was a competitor with Heracles in the suit for Deïaneira, and fought with him for the bride. Achelous was conquered in the contest, but as he possessed the power of assuming various forms, he metamorphosed himself first into a serpent and then into a bull. But in this form too he was conquered by Heracles, and deprived of one of his horns, which however he recovered by giving up the horn of Amalthea. (Ov. Met. ix. 8, &c.; Apollod. i. 8. § 1, ii. 7. § 5.)

Zeus Ammon

Zeus Ammon

 

Rising of Sun at Vernal Equinox in Aries Constellation (2000 b.C. – 0 C.E.)

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